T-Mobile hack: customer data for sale for 6 bitcoins
T-Mobile hack: customer data for sale for 6 bitcoins
Security

T-Mobile hack: customer data for sale for 6 bitcoins

By Stefania Stimolo - 16 Aug 2021

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Hack attack on the multinational mobile phone company of T-Mobile: the hacker allegedly stole the data of 100 million customers and claimed to sell a database for six bitcoins. 

According to reports, it seems that T-Mobile suffered a hack attack two weeks ago on its server, containing sensitive data of its customers. 

Specifically, the data of the 100 million stolen customers could include IMSIs, IMEIs, phone numbers, customer names, security PINs, Social Security numbers, driver’s license numbers, and date of birth, where IMEI refers to a unique number used to identify cell phones and IMSI, a unique number associated with a user on a cellular network.

The hacker has reportedly stolen T-Mobile’s entire IMEI database, including history from 2004 to the present. To confirm that, a screenshot of an SSH connection to a production server with Oracle was published.

Not only that, in the report, it is claimed that the cause of the violation would be revenge against the United States, that is, intending to damage the U.S. infrastructure. 

T-Mobile hack, the stolen data, and the sale in exchange for bitcoin

T-Mobile, meanwhile, seems to be actively investigating the attack suffered and the validity of the hacker’s claims. To that end, here’s how it commented:

“We are aware of the claims made in an underground forum and are actively investigating their validity. We have no further information to share at this time.”

And indeed, the attack in question does not involve the hackers contacting the multinational company. But instead, the hacker would already be making money from selling T-Mobile’s data on the web. 

Essentially, the hacker would claim that already for sale would be a database containing birth dates, driver’s license numbers, and social security numbers for 30 million people. The sale price of this registry, full of sensitive information, would be 6 bitcoins, the equivalent today of over $280,000. 

The situation of hacker and cryptocurrency attacks that took place last week is different. In fact, while with T-Mobile, BTC acts as a payment method to buy the stolen data (always according to what the hacker said), the case of Poly Network was definitely different. 

Two weekends ago, in fact, the DeFi cross-chain platform Poly Network had announced its “under-attack” status with the equivalent of $600 million in stolen cryptocurrencies

A situation that seems to have had a happy ending, with the collaboration of the hacker nicknamed Mr. White Hat, who allegedly acted to expose the vulnerability of the DeFi platform. 

Not only that, but Mr. White Hat would also arrange to return the stolen sum in the following crypto ETH, BUSD, BTCB, ETHB, BNB, USDC, DAI, UNI, SHIB, and FEI, with Poly Network reimbursing it directly to its users’ wallets. 

Stefania Stimolo

Graduated in Marketing and Communication, Stefania is an explorer of innovative opportunities. She started out as a Sales Assistant for e-commerce, and in 2016 she began to develop a passion for the digital world, initially in the Network Marketing sector, where she discovered and became passionate about the ideals behind Bitcoin and Blockchain technology, which lead her to work as a copywriter and translator for ICO projects and blogs, and organize introductory courses.

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